GEAR

Beach fun gets fitter with new toys and designs

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Waterproof wallet

This thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) pouch helps keep your credit cards and cash dry. (Kwik Tek)

Going to the beach and lying around on a towel all day doesn't cut it for everyone. For active people, the sand and surf are an extension of the gym, with nonstop movement ruling the day. Here are a few toys to help you keep your aerobic fitness, coordination and neuromuscular reaction time honed while the rest of the family binges on Cheetos, hot dogs and Red Bull.

Flexible flier

Aerobie Squidgie Disc: The 8-inch-diameter flying disk is made of a flexible rubber designed not to hurt the hands of players, the teeth of disk-catching dogs or the heads and backs of sunbathers hit by it.

Likes: Soft enough to catch easily without stinging, hard and hefty enough to fly true without getting blown around. Floats.

Dislikes: Less durable than the normal hard disk. Doesn't have the glide, air-float and distance of the plastic disks. Must work a bit harder to keep it straight.

Price: $6.75. www.aerobie.com

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World's slowest swimsuit

Rocket Science Sports Swim Drag Pants: The full-length stretch leggings are designed to catch water in extra material and folds in order to artificially increase the difficulty for a swimmer. The idea is to build greater strength, endurance and speed.

Likes: It works. Swimmers have used drag devices for years, including drag shorts and drag belts that are worn over regular Speedos. Rocket Science Sports claims that the key advantage of this long-leg unisex design is proper body positioning while in motion. Perfect for a triathlete itching for a workout as the family tends the barbecue.

Dislikes: Double the price of the more commonly used drag shorts.

Price: $70. www.rocketsciencesports.com

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Bike path carver

Trikke T78 Deluxe: This new, lower-cost version of the venerable self-propelled three-wheel "carving" vehicle moves forward by leaning it side to side and pushing off on the outside foot like a skater. It has a steel frame and leather hand-grips.

Likes: Flowing, exhilarating all-body movement that, once coordinated (takes 10 minutes to get the hang of it), provides an excellent workout yet can feel as effortless as flying. The bird's-eye view of the standing position is quite fun and comfortable, including for overweight folk who find the seated bike position irritating. Typical cruising speed of 10 to 15 miles per hour puts the wind in your face and gets your heart pumping like cycling. Air-filled 8.5-inch rubber tires provide better grip on wet and sandy bike-path surfaces than the skateboard wheels found on lower-end models. Friction brakes on the rear wheels provide good control. The adjustable handlebar height accommodates users from under 5 feet tall on up. The 24-pound frame folds down in seconds to fit in your car.

Dislikes: As with in-line skating, the Trikke's side-to-side carving takes up a wide space on the bike path, which can annoy some cyclists. (But most other onlookers love it; shy people may not like all the extra attention they get.)

Price: $389. www.trikke.com

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Paddle battle

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