Wayne LaPierre

The forgotten NRA leader who thought carrying guns should be 'sharply restricted'

The forgotten NRA leader who thought carrying guns should be 'sharply restricted'

In the early 1930s, with gangsters like John Dillinger mowing down his enemies with machine guns on the streets, Congress held hearings on a sweeping proposal to severely restrict firearm sales.

The testimony of one man — now totally forgotten — stood out.

"I have never believed in the general practice of carrying weapons," said Karl T. Frederick, according to a transcript of the hearings. "I do not believe in the general promiscuous toting of guns. I think it should be sharply restricted and only under licenses."

Frederick's words were notable then, and especially now, because of who he was: the president of the National Rifle...

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