Sun may return to Tidewater on Tuesday

Find out how residents are cleaning up after strong winds and flooding from Hurricane Joaquin pass through the area. 

5 p.m., Monday: 

After several days of rain, flooding and high winds on the Peninsula, the sun is expected to make a much-welcomed appearance on Tuesday.

"I know we haven't seen the sun much the last couple of days, the last week really," said Larry Brown, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Wakefield.

For Monday, there's a chance for rain, mainly before 2 p.m., as well as before 10 p.m., according to the National Weather Service. The day is expected to be mostly cloudy, with a high near 68 and a low around 59. New rain is expected to be minimal.

On Sunday, clouds returned after Saturday's brief glimpse of sun. In the afternoon, Yorktown and Sewell's Point in Norfolk experienced high tides 1.5 to 2 feet above flood stage, according to the National Weather Service in Wakefield.

The weather in Hampton Roads can be attributed to a high pressure system in Canada and a front stalled over the southeastern U.S., Brown said, which is also to blame for storms that have flooded South Carolina.

Hurricane Joaquin, which was downgraded to a Category 2 hurricane from a Category 4, was near Bermuda Sunday night and projected to move northeast into the Atlantic Ocean. Though far from the Virginia coast, it likely contributed moisture to the storms in the Southeast as well, Brown said.

Roughly 4 inches of rain were reported in Hampton and Poquoson through the weekend, and Seaford received almost 5.5 inches, according to National Weather Service reports.

A coastal flood warning remains in effect for the Peninsula and Middle Peninsula through Monday evening, and a high surf advisory is in effect until Tuesday morning. For Monday, forecasters predict high tides about a foot about flood stage. With high water levels in the Chesapeake Bay and local rivers, residents should prepare for some minor flooding on Tuesday, too, said Brown.

Wind was also an issue on Sunday, as the region was also under a wind advisory with winds of up to 45-50 miles an hour, leading to fallen trees and downed power lines in some places. Hundreds of Hampton, Gloucester and Newport News residents lost power.

9 a.m., Monday: 

After several days of rain, flooding and high winds on the Peninsula, the sun is expected to make a much-welcomed appearance on Tuesday.

"I know we haven't seen the sun much the last couple of days, the last week really," said Larry Brown, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Wakefield.

For Monday, there's a chance for rain, mainly before 2 p.m., as well as before 10 p.m., according to the National Weather Service. The day is expected to be mostly cloudy, with a high near 68 and a low around 59. New rain is expected to be minimal.

On Sunday, clouds returned after Saturday's brief glimpse of sun. In the afternoon, Yorktown and Sewell's Point in Norfolk experienced high tides 1.5 to 2 feet above flood stage, according to the National Weather Service in Wakefield.

The weather in Hampton Roads can be attributed to a high pressure system in Canada and a front stalled over the southeastern U.S., Brown said, which is also to blame for storms that have flooded South Carolina.

Hurricane Joaquin, which was downgraded to a Category 2 hurricane from a Category 4, was near Bermuda Sunday night and projected to move northeast into the Atlantic Ocean. Though far from the Virginia coast, it likely contributed moisture to the storms in the Southeast as well, Brown said.

Roughly 4 inches of rain were reported in Hampton and Poquoson through the weekend, and Seaford received almost 5.5 inches, according to National Weather Service reports.

A coastal flood warning remains in effect for the Peninsula and Middle Peninsula through Monday evening, and a high surf advisory is in effect until Tuesday morning. For Monday, forecasters predict high tides about a foot about flood stage. With high water levels in the Chesapeake Bay and local rivers, residents should prepare for some minor flooding on Tuesday, too, said Brown.

Wind was also an issue on Sunday, as the region was also under a wind advisory with winds of up to 45-50 miles an hour, leading to fallen trees and downed power lines in some places. Hundreds of Hampton, Gloucester and Newport News residents lost power.

The wind was still howling Sunday morning as residents of the water-logged Pasture Point neighborhood in Hampton began trying to regain some normalcy after their neighborhood was flooded by the Hampton River this weekend.

5:30 p.m., Sunday:

High tide brought the worst flooding of the weekend to Kirby Street, First Street and Lee Street in downtown West Point.

About 3.5 feet of water filled Kirby Street, where kids played on kayaks and tubes and dogs ran through the water fetching balls and sticks.

Normal flooding on Kirby Street usually reaches a person's ankles. Today Emma Ragsdale, 13, said the water reached her hips.

"The river's just coming right through," said Justin Harper, 12, adding that if Hurricane Joaquin had hit West Point many of the houses would have been damaged.

No homes seem to be damaged during the storm, although high tide brought enough water to cover docks and yards, sometime seeping into garages.

"The Pamunkey River is our problem. It's not really the York River. It's just now starting to come over my dock and this is the first time it's done that," said CeCe Johnson, who owns a house on First Street. As she spoke her grandson, Jack Johnson, 5, played on a tube in front of the house.

4:50 p.m., Saturday:

High tide brought about 3 feet of water from the Pamunkey River to Kirby Street, located on the south side of downtown West Point.

Neighbors stood in flooded yards trying to spot fish and watching neighborhood children float happily over the street in kayaks. 

"I don't like it this high. It's not fun anymore at this point," said Brock Thomlinson, standing on his driveway up to his knees in water.

Kirby Street has been known to flood during a full moon or a storm, but tides from Hurricane Joaquin have brought the waters almost as high as Thomlinson has ever seen them. 

The only time the tides were higher was during Hurricane Isabel in 2003 when the water reached the front windows of Thomlinson's house.

"It doesn't normally come this high," Thomlinson said, adding that FEMA paid to lift the house across the street by 6 feet last year because water was getting inside the home. Even with the lift, water found its way into the garage during today's high tide.

1:15 p.m., Saturday:

The streets of West Point are mostly clear after a night of rain, high tides and flooding, especially on the south side of downtown. There is some water gathered along Main Street, but it is passable.

Certain streets on the south side are blocked off to traffic in anticipation of another high tide at 3:30 p.m.

Twins Eliza and Sophia Diggs, 11, and their friend Madeline Peebles, 11, dressed up in shorts and rain boots to build a boat out of scrap wood.

The three girls successfully floated their small boat in the rising Pamunkey River before it began to rain and they headed to their waterfront house on First Street.

Flooding near waterfront property and in the south streets of downtown has been the biggest outcome of the storm so far. 

The dock at the Diggs sisters' home was covered by about a foot of water on Friday afternoon, and their brother and his friends swam over it, Sophia said.

"We came out in rain boots because we were going to swim in it," Madeline said. 

In an empty lot on the south side of First Street, Eli Brockwell, 13, and a half dozen of his friends played a game of touch football while light rain sprinkled down.

"There's been a lot of flooding," Eli said, adding that he was relieved that the storm hasn't been worse.

4 p.m., Friday: 

Drive time forecast: 

A coastal flood warning remains in effect until 6 p.m. Friday and a flood watch is in effect through Saturday evening.

High water levels continue to be a concern for low-lying areas as low tide levels are expected to be that of an average high tide. The next high tide should be three-tenths of a foot lower than the previous one.

Storm surges in Yorktown are being recorded as being 2.5 to 3.5 feet above normal, according to the National Weather Service. 

Despite the continued rain, Dominion Power is reporting fewer than 100 customers without power. 

Here is the NWS forecast for the rest of Friday into Saturday:

Friday evening

Rain before 8pm, then showers, mainly after 8pm. The rain could be heavy at times. Low around 57. Northeast wind around 16 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New precipitation amounts between a half and three quarters of an inch possible.

Saturday

Showers likely. Cloudy, with a high near 70. Northeast wind around 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New precipitation amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch possible.

Saturday Night

Showers likely. Cloudy, with a low around 67. Northeast wind around 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New precipitation amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch possible.

9 a.m., Friday: 

Heavy bands of rain continue to sweep over the area as moisture from Hurricane Joaquin meets with a stalled cold front that's currently parked over the region.

Latest models from the National Hurricane Center continue to keep Hurricane Joaquin churning away from the U.S. mainland.

Meanwhile, expect rain to continue falling for all day and well into the night, according to area forecasts, with pockets of heavy rain this afternoon. 

Tidal flooding will remain an issue, as strong winds will push tides onto the coast during high tide this afternoon.

12:02 p.m., Thursday:

Although the West Point Food Lion is busier today than on an average Thursday afternoon, there are still plenty of storm supplies available, including water and bread.

11:45 a.m., Thursday: 

West Point officials have canceled the Crab Carnival, which was set to take place Friday and Saturday. Check the Tidewater Review's website for further cancellations and closures. 

Hurricane Joaquin is now a category 3 storm with maximum sustained winds of 125 mph, according to the National Weather Service. 

The storm is expected to buzz the Eastern seaboard, although more accurate forecasts will come through the weekend. Existing predictions place the storm's eye parallel to Norfolk and the greater Norfolk region around 7 a.m. Monday. 

Update: 8:45 a.m., Thursday: 

A flood watch is in effect for the Middle Peninsula through Saturday evening. A coastal flood watch is also impacting the area through Saturday afternoon.

Rain is expected to continue along a stalled front over coastal Virginia through Saturday. 

Residents should expect periods of heavy rain that will tally 5 to 7 inches through Saturday, according to the National Weather Service. 

Air Force Hunter Aircraft recorded maximum sustained wind speeds near 105 mph as Joaquin tracked over central Bahamas on Wednesday night.

The center of the storm is expected to track near or over portions of northwestern Bahamas, strengthening Thursday and Friday. The storm could become a major hurricane impacting portions of the southeast by Thursday.

Hurricane Joaquin is then forecast to impact the region Saturday evening through Sunday, bringing an combined total of 7 to 10 inches of rain by the time both systems pass. 

Joaquin will bring a renewed threat of flooding and gusty winds, according to the National Weather Service.  

Here are some recommendations to stay safe in emergency situations:

Make a plan. Your emergency plan should include where you will go if you have to evacuate your home, as well as multiple evacuation routes. You should also arrange for a place you will meet your family members if you become separated. Also establish an out-of-town contact who can coordinate communication.

Stock up. Local emergency management officials urge you to have at least one gallon of water per day per person for seven days. You should also have nonperishable food items for seven days. Stock up on flashlights and extra batteries, as well as a hand-crank or battery-powered radio. Assemble a first aid kit. Keep on hand cash, in small denominations, in case you can't use credit/debit cards. A supply of personal hygiene items and change of clothes is also recommended.

Emergency kits should contain:

  • One gallon of water per person, per day.
  • Nonperishable food.
  • Hand-cranked or battery-powered weather radio with extra batteries.
  • Flashlight and extra batteries.
  • First aid kit.
  • Prescription medications.
  • Hand-operated can opener.
  • Personal care products.
  • Food and water for pets.

Consider your medical needs. Make sure to have enough prescription medication or other medical supplies in case you do not have access to refills for several days.

Fill your gas tank. Gas stations may not have backup generators. If the power goes out, you may not have access to fuel for several days.

Remember your pets. Make sure to have enough pet supplies. Also include in your plan where your pets will go if you have to evacuate. If you need to use a shelter, make sure to bring enough pet food, cages, litter boxes, and other supplies.

Stay connected. The American Red Cross offers a free emergency app. The app sends local weather alerts and includes tips for assembling an emergency kit and plan. It includes an "I'm Safe" button to let loved ones know you are OK if other methods of communication go down, and a real-time map to help you find the location of Red Cross shelters. Learn more at redcross.org/apps.

- Daily Press staff contributed to this report.

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